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Connecticut

Offences against humanity and morality

Statute Details
Printable Version
Citation: Conn. Gen. Stat. 6402-6405 (1918).



Last Checked by Web Center Staff:

Summary:  

Sections 6402-6405 of Chapter 333 from the 1918 General Laws of Connecticut covers offences against humanity and morality .  Specifically, the statutes cover following topics: animal cruelty, transportation of animals, and docking of horses.



Statute in Full:

 

CHAPTER 333.

Offences against humanity and morality.

Section 6402. Cruelty to animals. Every person who over-drives, drives when overloaded, overworks, tortures, deprives of necessary sustenance, mutilates, or cruelly beats or kills, any animal, or causes it do be done; and ever person who, having the charge or custody of any such animal, inflicts unnecessary cruelty upon it, or unnecessarily fails to provide it with proper food, drink or protection from the weather, or who cruelly abandons it, or carries it in an unnecessarily cruel manner, shall be fined not more than two hundred and fifty dollars or imprisoned in jail not more than one year or both.

Rev. 1902, Sec. 1331. 1909, ch. 154.

See Sec. 1885.

Section 6403. Docking of horses. Whoever cuts the bone of the tail of any horse for the purpose of docking the tail, or whoever causes or knowingly permits it do be done upon the premises of which he is the owner, lessee, proprietor or user, or whoever assists in or is present at such cutting, shall be fined not more than three hundred dollars or imprisoned in jail not more than one year or both.

Rev. 1902, Sec. 1332.

Section 6404. Prima facie evidence of docking. If a horse is found with its tail so cut, and with the wound resulting from such cutting unhealed, upon the premises of any person, such facts shall be prima facie evidence that the person who occupies or has use of the premises on which such horse is so found has committed the offense described in section 6403. If such a horse is found with his tail so cut, and with the wound resulting from such cutting unhealed, in the charge or custody of any person, such facts shall be prima facie evidence that the person having the charge or custody of such horse has committed the offense charged in section 6403.

Rev. 1902, Sec. 1333.

Section 6405. Transportation of animals on railroads. No railroad company, in transporting animals, shall permit them to be confined in cars more than twenty-eight consecutive hours, except when transported in cars in which they have proper food, water, space and opportunity for rest, without unloading them for food, water and rest, for at least five consecutive hours, unless prevented by storm or other accidental cause; and in estimating such confinement, the time during which the animals have been confined, without such rest, on connecting roads from which they are received, shall be included. Animals so unloaded shall be properly fed, watered and sheltered during such rest by the owner or person having their custody, or on his neglect, by the railroad company transporting them, at his expense; and said company shall, in such case, have a lien upon such animals for food, care and custody furnished, and shall not be liable for any detention of them for such purpose; and any such company, owner or custodian of such animals, who shall not comply with the provisions of this section, shall be fined not more than five hundred dollars. The knowledge and acts of agents of, and of persons employed by, such company, in regard to animals transported, owned, or employed by it, or in its custody, shall be held to be its acts and knowledge.

Rev. 1902, Sec. 1334.

See Sec. 1885.



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