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Pig: Related Statutes

Statute Name Citation Summary
AZ - Humane Slaughter - Slaughter of Animals   AZ ST § 3-2001 - 2017   This Arizona statutory section covers the slaughter of animals.  Among its provisions include license requirements for the slaughter meat, recordkeeping requirements, and a section relating to humane slaughter.  The humane slaughter law requires that a livestock animal is rendered insensible to pain prior to being hoisted or shackled; however, none of the provisions apply to one who slaughters an animal for his or her own uses.  Interestingly, while the other provisions relating to adulterated meat and licensing requirements describe the penalty for violation, no penalty is listed under the humane slaughter statute.  
CA - Humane Slaughter - Chapter 6. Slaughter   CA FOOD & AG § 19501 - 19503   This California section constitutes the humane slaughter provisions for cattle, calves, horses, mules, sheep, swine, goats, fallow deer, and poultry.  The law provides that the animal shall be rendered insensible to pain by a captive bolt, gunshot, electrical or chemical means, or any other means that is rapid and effective before being cut, shackled, hoisted, thrown, or cast, with the exception of poultry which may be shackled.  Note that despite the section covering poultry, it does not apply to the slaughter of spent hens and small game birds, as defined by the department by regulation.   
CA - Pigs, Wild - Chapter 7. Wild Pigs   CA FISH & G § 4650 - 4657   These provisions make it unlawful to take any wild pig in California without first procuring a license tag authorizing the taking.  These sections outline the requirements for licenses and require plans for the management of wild pigs. Under these plans, the status and trend of wild pig populations are determined and management units shall be designated within the state.  
CA - Slaughter - Part 3. Slaughtered Animals. Chapter 6. Slaughter   CA FOOD & AG § 19501 - 19503   These sections enumerate the prescribed methods for slaughtering cattle, calves, horses, mules, sheep, swine, goats, fallow deer, and poultry.  The regulations adopted under this chapter are required to conform as far as possible to the regulations of the United States Department of Agriculture governing methods of slaughtering.  
CA - Slaughter - § 599f. Nonambulatory animals; slaughter houses, stockyards, auctions, market agencies, or dealers; transactions; processing; euthanasia; movement; violations   CA PENAL § 599f    As used in this section, "nonambulatory" means unable to stand and walk without assistance.  This statute prohibits a slaughterhouse that is not inspected by the United States Department of Agriculture, stockyard, or auction shall buy, sell, or receive a nonambulatory animal.  Effective July 2008, the law also states that no slaughterhouse shall sell meat from non-ambulatory animals for human consumption. The penalty was also increased from an unspecified misdemeanor to a penalty of up to one year in jail or a fine of up to $20,000 or both.  
CO - Farming - Article 50.5. Confinement of Calves Raised for Veal and Pregnant Sows   CO ST § 35-50.5-101 to 103   This 2008 Colorado statute applies to the confinement of calves raised for veal and pigs during pregnancy. This statute provides that calves raised for veal and sows during pregnancy must be able to lie down, stand up, and turn around without touching the sides of their enclosure.  
CO - Humane Slaughter - Article 33. Custom Processing of Meat Animals.   CO ST § 35-33-101 to 407   This Colorado section includes both the meat processing laws and the humane slaughter provisions.  It covers livestock, which are defined as cattle, calves, sheep, swine, horses, mules, goats, and any other animal which may be used in and for the preparation of meat or meat products.  No processor shall shackle, hoist, or otherwise bring livestock into position for slaughter or shall slaughter livestock except by humane methods as defined by regulation; the use of a manually operated hammer, sledge, or poleax is not permitted.  Additionally, poultry shall be slaughtered in accordance with "good commercial practices" and in a manner that will result in thorough bleeding.  Any person who violates any provision is subject to a civil penalty of not more than $750 per violation for each day of violation and commits a class 2 misdemeanor.  
FL - Cruel Confinement - § 21. Limiting Cruel and Inhumane Confinement of Pigs During Pregnancy   FL CONST Art. 10 § 21  

This ballot proposal, adopted in 2002 and effective in 2008, addresses the inhumane treatment of animals, specifically, pregnant pigs. The law provides that to prevent cruelty to animals and as recommended by The Humane Society of the United States, no person shall confine a pig during pregnancy in a cage, crate or other enclosure, or tether a pregnant pig, on a farm so that the pig is prevented from turning around freely, except for veterinary purposes and during the prebirthing period; provides definitions, penalties, and an effective date. This measure passed in the November 2002 election with 54% of the vote.

 
IN - Humane Slaughter - Chapter 5. Meat and Poultry Inspection; Humane Slaughter Act   IN ST 15-17-5-1 to 31  

This Indiana statutory section comprises both the state's meat processing laws and humane slaughter provisions.   The state board responsible for carrying out this Act are empowered to adopt rules governing humane methods to make livestock or poultry insensible to pain before incision of an instrument for severance of the carotid arteries. The rules must conform as far as applicable to the regulations promulgated under the Federal Humane Slaughter Act.  Most of the laws in this section pertain to inspection of commercial livestock facilities and the labeling of postmortem and antemortem animals.  However, violation of the humane slaughter provisions appear to result in a Class B misdemeanor where there has been a "reckless violation."

 
ME - Farming - An Act To Prohibit Cruel Confinement of Calves Raised for Veal and Sows during Gestation   LD 1021 (2009)  

This bill prohibits the cruel confinement of calves raised for veal and sows during gestation. It specifically prohibits a person from confining an animal covered under the law (a sow during gestation or calf raised for veal) the majority of a day in a manner that prevents the animal from lying down, standing up and fully extending the animal’s limbs, and turning around freely. It becomes effective January 1, 2011.

 
MS - Slaughter - Chapter 35. Meat Inspection   MS ST § 75-35-1 to 75-35-327   These Mississippi statutes regulate meat products, animal slaughter, inspection and branding. Animals to be slaughtered must examined and slaughtered humanely, which means being “rendered insensible to pain... before being shackled, hoisted, thrown, cast or cut.” Meat and meat products must be labeled “Mississippi inspected and passed.” Any violation of the provisions may result in imprisonment and/or a fine.  
MS - Slaughter - Chapter 35. Meat Inspection.   MS ST § 75-35-7   This Mississippi statute, last amended in 2006, concerns the slaughter of livestock, such as cattle, pigs, and horses. The statute gives the Commissioner of Agriculture and Commerce in Mississippi the authority to: 1) inspect animals before slaughter to determine if any are diseased and should be slaughtered separately, and 2) inspect slaughter establishments for humane methods of slaughter.  
MS - Slaughter - Chapter 35. Meat Inspection.   Miss. Code Ann. § 75-35-21   This Mississippi statute, last amended in 2006, concerns prohibited acts in the sale, transportation, and slaughter of livestock, such as cattle, pigs, and horses. This statute prohibits the sale or transportation of any animal that is adulterated or misbranded, as well as any act that causes adulteration or misbranding of any animal. This statute also prohibits any slaughter that is not considered humane.  
NH - Humane Slaughter - Chapter 427. Livestock and Meat Inspection. Humane Slaughter   N.H. Rev. Stat. § 427:33 - 427:37   These laws comprise New Hampshire's humane slaughter provisions.  A humane method is defined as one where the animal is rendered insensible to pain by a single blow or shot of a mechanical instrument or by electrical, chemical or other means that is rapid and effective, before being shackled, hoisted, thrown, cast, or cut.  Ritual slaughter required by the ritual of the Jewish faith, whereby the animal suffers loss of consciousness by anemia of the brain is also allowed.  Any slaughterer who violates this subdivision shall be guilty of a misdemeanor.  
OH - Humane Slaughter - Chapter 945. Humane Slaughter of Livestock.   R.C. § 945.01 - 99   These laws comprise Ohio's humane slaughter provisions.  After July 1, 1967, no method of slaughtering livestock or handling in connection with the commercial slaughtering of livestock shall be utilized unless it is humane.  Humane methods are defined as those that render animals insensible to pain by a single blow or gunshot or an electrical, chemical, or other means that is rapid and effective.  Slaughter in accordance with the ritual requirements of the Jewish faith or any other religious faith that prescribes a method of slaughter whereby the animal suffers loss of consciousness by anemia of the brain is also allowed.  Violation of the act results in a fine of not more than one hundred dollars.  
OR - Animal Definitions - Chapter 87. Statutory Liens. Liens Generally. 87.142. Definitions   O. R. S. § 87.142   This is Oregon's statutory definitions for Animal Statutes.  
OR - Humane Slaughter - Chapter 603. Meat Dealers and Slaughterers. Meat Dealers and Slaughterers, in General.   O. R. S. § 603.010 - 992   These Oregon laws comprise the state's slaughter laws.  Among the provisions is the humane slaughter law, which requires that cattle, equines, sheep, or swine are slaughtered by by any method which renders the animal insensible to pain by a single blow or gunshot or by an electrical, chemical or other means that is rapid and effective; or by a method in accordance with the ritual requirements of any religious faith that prescribes a method of slaughter whereby the animal suffers loss of consciousness by anemia of the brain.  Violation of ORS 603.065 (the humane slaughter law) is a Class B misdemeanor.  
PA - Humane Slaughter - Slaughter and Processing of Domestic Animals   3 Pa.C.S.A. § 2361 - 2362   These laws comprise Pennsylvania's humane slaughter provisions.  The section begins with the enabling statute that grants authority to the relevant state agency.  It then declares that humane methods shall be used in the handling of domestic animals for slaughter and in the actual bleeding and slaughter of domestic animals except in the cases of slaughter for ritual purposes or individual (e.g., non-commercial) consumption.  The law itself does not proscribe penalties for non-compliance (but such may be listed in departmental regulations).  
RI - Humane Slaughter - Chapter 17. Humane Slaughter of Livestock   Gen. Laws, 1956, § 4-17-1 - 7   This section comprises Rhode Island's humane slaughter provisions.  It begins first by declaring it to be the policy of the state that the slaughter of all livestock and the handling of livestock, in connection with slaughter, be carried out only by humane methods.  A "humane method" is defined as a method through which the animal is rendered insensible to pain by mechanical, electrical, chemical or other means that is rapid and effective before being shackled, hoisted, thrown, cast, or cut; or a method in accordance with the ritual requirements of the Jewish faith or any other religious faith through which the animal suffers loss of consciousness by anemia of the brain.  Any person who violates any provision of this chapter shall, upon conviction, be punished by a fine of not more than five hundred ($500) dollars, or by imprisonment for not more than one year.  
US - Food Animal - Twenty Eight Hour Law of 1877   49 USC 80502   This Federal law addresses the transportation of animals, including those raised for food or in food production, across state lines. The statute provides that animals cannot be transported by "rail carrier, express carrier or common carrier" (except by air or water) for more than 28 consecutive hours without being unloaded for five hours for rest, water and food.  
VT - Humane Slaughter - Humane Slaughter of Livestock   6 V.S.A. § 3131 - 3134   These statutes comprise Vermont's humane slaughter provisions.  The law requires the humane slaughter of all commercial livestock with a "humane method" defined as a method whereby the animal is rendered insensible to pain by mechanical, electrical, chemical or other means that is rapid and effective before being shackled, hoisted, thrown, cast or cut (with exemptions for religious ritual slaughter).  A person who violates this chapter shall be fined not more than $100.00 nor less than $50.00 or imprisoned not more than ninety days, or both, and in addition, the secretary may seek an injunction against a slaughterer.  
VT - Impound - Sub Chapter 2. Pounds and Impounds.   20 V.S.A. § 3381 - 3485   The following Vermont statutes require that each organized Vermont town maintain a pound or else the town will be fined $30.00. The statutes also provide provisions for impounding an animal, retrieving an impounded animal, failing to retrieve an impounded animal, and assessing damages of an impounded animal, amongst other topics.  
WV - Humane Slaughter - Article 2E. Humane Slaughter of Livestock.   WV ST § 19-2E-1 - 7   The West Virginia humane slaughter provisions apply to livestock, defined as cattle, swine, sheep or goats.  Humane methods of slaughtering livestock include those where the animal is rendered insensible to pain by a single blow, gunshot or by electrical, chemical or other means, or by slaughtering in accordance with the ritual requirements of the Jewish faith or any other religious faith that prescribes a method of slaughter by the simultaneous and instantaneous severance of the carotid arteries.  The section provides a graduating scheme of penalties for violation; a first offense results in a misdemeanor punishable by a fine of $100 - $500; a second offense results in a misdemeanor with a fine of $500 - 1,000 and suspension of the license to do business as a slaughtering establishment until the facility is in compliance.  

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