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TITLE 50--WILDLIFE AND FISHERIES. CHAPTER I--UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR. SUBCHAPTER B--TAKING, POSSESSION, TRANSPORTATION, SALE, PURCHASE, BARTER, EXPORTATION, AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS. PART 17--ENDANGERED AND THREATENED WILDLIFE AND PLANTS. SUBPART C--ENDANGERED WILDLIFE.



Country of Origin: United States

Agency of Origin: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Department of the Interior

National Citation: 50 C.F.R. 17.21 - 17.23

Agency Citation:

Printable Version


Last checked by Web Center Staff: 07/2011


Summary:  

These Endangered Species Act regulations describe illegal actions with respect to endangered wildlife, including prohibited taking, transporting, and selling among other things.  They also outline exceptions to the taking prohibition including those related to scientific purposes, enhancement of a species propagation, and economic hardship permits.


Material in Full:

§ 17.21 Prohibitions

§ 17.22 Permits for scientific purposes, enhancement of propagation or survival, or for incidental taking

§ 17.23 Economic hardship permits

 

§ 17.21 Prohibitions.

(a) Except as provided in Subpart A of this part, or under permits issued pursuant to § 17.22 or § 17.23, it is unlawful for any person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States to commit, to attempt to commit, to solicit another to commit or to cause to be committed, any of the acts described in paragraphs (b) through (f) of this section in regard to any endangered wildlife.

(b) Import or export. It is unlawful to import or to export any endangered wildlife. Any shipment in transit through the United States is an importation and an exportation, whether or not it has entered the country for customs purposes.

(c) Take.

(1) It is unlawful to take endangered wildlife within the United States, within the territorial sea of the United States, or upon the high seas. The high seas shall be all waters seaward of the territorial sea of the United States, except waters officially recognized by the United States as the territorial sea of another country, under international law.

(2) Notwithstanding paragraph (c)(1) of this section, any person may take endangered wildlife in defense of his own life or the lives of others.

(3) Notwithstanding paragraph (c)(1) of this section, any employee or agent of the Service, any other Federal land management agency, the National Marine Fisheries Service, or a State conservation agency, who is designated by his agency for such purposes, may, when acting in the course of his official duties, take endangered wildlife without a permit if such action is necessary to:

(i) Aid a sick, injured or orphaned specimen; or

(ii) Dispose of a dead specimen; or

(iii) Salvage a dead specimen which may be useful for scientific study; or

(iv) Remove specimens which constitute a demonstrable but nonimmediate threat to human safety, provided that the taking is done in a humane manner; the taking may involve killing or injuring only if it has not been reasonably possible to eliminate such threat by live-capturing and releasing the specimen unharmed, in a remote area.

(4) Any taking under paragraphs (c)(2) and (3) of this section must be reported in writing to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office of Law Enforcement, 4401 North Fairfax Drive, LE-3000, Arlington, VA 22203, within five days. The specimen may only be retained, disposed of, or salvaged under directions from the Office of Law Enforcement.

(5) Notwithstanding paragraph (c)(1) of this section, any qualified employee or agent of a State Conservation Agency which is a party to a Cooperative Agreement with the Service in accordance with section 6(c) of the Act, who is designated by his agency for such purposes, may, when acting in the course of his official duties take those endangered species which are covered by an approved cooperative agreement for conservation programs in accordance with the Cooperative Agreement, provided that such taking is not reasonably anticipated to result in:

(i) The death or permanent disabling of the specimen;

(ii) The removal of the specimen from the State where the taking occurred;

(iii) The introduction of the specimen so taken, or of any progeny derived from such a specimen, into an area beyond the historical range of the species; or

(iv) The holding of the specimen in captivity for a period of more than 45 consecutive days.

(6) Notwithstanding paragraph (c)(1) of this section, any person acting under a valid migratory bird rehabilitation permit issued pursuant to § 21.31 of this subchapter may take endangered migratory birds without an endangered species permit if such action is necessary to aid a sick, injured, or orphaned endangered migratory bird, provided the permittee:

(i) Notifies the issuing Migratory Bird Permit Office immediately upon receipt of such bird (contact information for your issuing office is listed on your permit and on the Internet at http://offices.fws.gov); and

(ii) Disposes of or transfers such birds, or their parts or feathers, as directed by the Migratory Bird Permit Office.

(7) Notwithstanding paragraph (c)(1) of this section, persons exempt from the permit requirements of § 21.12(c) and (d) of this subchapter may take sick and injured endangered migratory birds without an endangered species permit in performing the activities authorized under § 21.12(c) and (d).

(d) Possession and other acts with unlawfully taken wildlife.

(1) It is unlawful to possess, sell, deliver, carry, transport, or ship, by any means whatsoever, any endangered wildlife which was taken in violation of paragraph (c) of this section.

  Example. A person captures a whooping crane in Texas and gives it to a second person, who puts it in a closed van and drives thirty miles, to another location in Texas. The second person then gives the whooping crane to a third person, who is apprehended with the bird in his possession. All three have violated the law--the first by illegally taking the whooping crane; the second by transporting an illegally taken whooping crane; and the third by possessing an illegally taken whooping crane.

(2) Notwithstanding paragraph (d)(1) of this section, Federal and State law enforcement officers may possess, deliver, carry, transport or ship any endangered wildlife taken in violation of the Act as necessary in performing their official duties.

(3) Notwithstanding paragraph (d)(1) of this section, any person acting under a valid migratory bird rehabilitation permit issued pursuant to § 21.31 of this subchapter may possess and transport endangered migratory birds without an endangered species permit when such action is necessary to aid a sick, injured, or orphaned endangered migratory bird, provided the permittee:

(i) Notifies the issuing Migratory Bird Permit Office immediately upon receipt of such bird (contact information for your issuing office is listed on your permit and on the Internet at http://offices.fws.gov); and

(ii) Disposes of or transfers such birds, or their parts or feathers, as directed by the Migratory Bird Permit Office.

(4) Notwithstanding paragraph (d)(1) of this section, persons exempt from the permit requirements of § 21.12(c) and (d) of this subchapter may possess and transport sick and injured endangered migratory bird species without an endangered species permit in performing the activities authorized under § 21.12(c) and (d).

(e) Interstate or foreign commerce. It is unlawful to deliver, receive, carry transport, or ship in interstate or foreign commerce, by any means whatsoever, and in the course of a commercial activity, any endangered wildlife.

(f) Sale or offer for sale.

(1) It is unlawful to sell or to offer for sale in interstate or foreign commerce any endangered wildlife.

(2) An advertisement for the sale of endangered wildlife which carries a warning to the effect that no sale may be consummated until a permit has been obtained from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service shall not be considered an offer for sale within the meaning of this section.

(g) Captive-bred wildlife.

(1) Notwithstanding paragraphs (b), (c), (e) and (f) of this section, any person may take; export or re-import; deliver, receive, carry, transport or ship in interstate or foreign commerce, in the course of a commercial activity; or sell or offer for sale in interstate or foreign commerce any endangered wildlife that is bred in captivity in the United States provided either that the wildlife is of a taxon listed in paragraph (g)(6) of this section, or that the following conditions are met:

(i) The wildlife is of a species having a natural geographic distribution not including any part of the United States, or the wildlife is of a species that the Director has determined to be eligible in accordance with paragraph (g)(5) of this section;

(ii) The purpose of such activity is to enhance the propagation or survival of the affected species;

(iii) Such activity does not involve interstate or foreign commerce, in the course of a commercial activity, with respect to non-living wildlife;

(iv) Each specimen of wildlife to be re-imported is uniquely identified by a band, tattoo or other means that was reported in writing to an official of the Service at a port of export prior to export from the United States; and

(v) Any person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States who engages in any of the activities authorized by this paragraph does so in accordance with paragraphs (g)(2), (3) and (4) of this section, and with all other applicable regulations in this Subchapter B.

(2) Any person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States seeking to engage in any of the activities authorized by this paragraph must first register with the Service (Office of Management Authority, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 4401 N. Fairfax Drive, Arlington, Virginia 22203). Requests for registration must be submitted on an official application form (Form 3-200- 41) provided by the Service, and must include the following information:

(i) The types of wildlife sought to be covered by the registration, identified by common and scientific name to the taxonomic level of family, genus or species;

(ii) A description of the applicant's experience in maintaining and propagating the types of wildlife sought to be covered by the registration, and when appropriate, in conducting research directly related to maintaining and propagating such wildlife;

(iii) Photograph(s) or other evidence clearly depicting the facilities where such wildlife will be maintained; and

(iv) A copy of the applicant's license or registration, if any, under the animal welfare regulations of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (9 CFR part 2).

(3) Upon receiving a complete application, the Director will decide whether or not the registration will be approved. In making this decision, the Director will consider, in addition to the general criteria in § 13.21(b) of this subchapter, whether the expertise, facilities or other resources available to the applicant appear adequate to enhance the propagation or survival of the affected wildlife. Public education activities may not be the sole basis to justify issuance of a registration or to otherwise establish eligibility for the exception granted in paragraph (g)(1) of this section. Each person so registered must maintain accurate written records of activities conducted under the registration, and allow reasonable access to Service agents for inspection purposes as set forth in §§ 13.46 and 13.47. Each person registered must submit to the Director an individual written annual report of activities, including all births, deaths and transfers of any type.

(4) Any person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States seeking to export or conduct foreign commerce in captive-bred endangered wildlife that will not remain under the care of that person must first obtain approval by providing written evidence to satisfy the Director that the proposed recipient of the wildlife has expertise, facilities or other resources adequate to enhance the propagation or survival of such wildlife and that the proposed recipient will use such wildlife for purposes of enhancing the propagation or survival of the affected species.

(5)(i) The Director will use the following criteria to determine if wildlife of any species having a natural geographic distribution that includes any part of the United States is eligible for the provisions of this paragraph:

(A) Whether there is a low demand for taking of the species from wild populations, either because of the success of captive breeding or because of other reasons, and

(B) Whether the wild populations of the species are effectively protected from unauthorized taking as a result of the inaccessibility of their habitat to humans or as a result of the effectiveness of law enforcement.

(ii) The Director will follow the procedures set forth in the Act and in the regulations thereunder with respect to petitions and notification of the public and governors of affected States when determining the eligibility of species for purposes of this paragraph.

(iii) In accordance with the criteria in paragraph (g)(5)(i) of this section, the Director has determined the following species to be eligible for the provisions of this paragraph:

Laysan duck (Anas laysanensis).

(6) Any person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States seeking to engage in any of the activities authorized by paragraph (g)(1) of this section may do so without first registering with the Service with respect to the bar-tailed pheasant (Syrmaticus humiae), Elliot's pheasant (S. ellioti), Mikado pheasant (S. mikado), brown eared pheasant (Crossoptilon mantchuricum), white eared pheasant (C. crossoptilon), cheer pheasant (Catreus wallichii), Edward's pheasant (Lophura edwardsi), Swinhoe's pheasant (L. swinhoii), Chinese monal (Lophophorus lhuysii), and Palawan peacock pheasant (Polyplectron emphanum); parakeets of the species Neophema pulchella and N. splendida; the Laysan duck (Anas laysanensis); the white-winged wood duck (Cairina scutulata); and the inter-subspecific crossed or "generic" tiger (Panthera tigris) (i e., specimens not identified or identifiable as members of the Bengal, Sumatran, Siberian or Indochinese subspecies (Panthera tigris tigris, P.t. sumatrae, P.t. altaica and P.t. corbetti, respectively) provided:

(i) The purpose of such activity is to enhance the propagation or survival of the affected exempted species;

(ii) Such activity does not involve interstate or foreign commerce, in the course of a commercial activity, with respect to non-living wildlife;

(iii) Each specimen to be re-imported is uniquely identified by a band, tattoo or other means that was reported in writing to an official of the Service at a port of export prior to export of the specimen from the United States;

(iv) No specimens of the taxa in this paragraph (g)(6) of this section that were taken from the wild may be imported for breeding purposes absent a definitive showing that the need for new bloodlines can only be met by wild specimens, that suitable foreign-bred, captive individuals are unavailable, and that wild populations can sustain limited taking, and an import permit is issued under § 17.22;

(v) Any permanent exports of such specimens meet the requirements of paragraph (g)(4) of this section; and

(vi) Each person claiming the benefit of the exception in paragraph (g)(1) of this section must maintain accurate written records of activities, including births, deaths and transfers of specimens, and make those records accessible to Service agents for inspection at reasonable hours as set forth in §§ 13.46 and 13.47.

(h) U.S. captive-bred scimitar-horned oryx, addax, and dama gazelle. Notwithstanding paragraphs (b), (c), (e), and (f) of this section, any person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States may take; export or re-import; deliver, receive, carry, transport or ship in interstate or foreign commerce, in the course of a commercial activity; or sell or offer for sale in interstate or foreign commerce live wildlife, including embryos and gametes, and sport-hunted trophies of scimitar-horned oryx (Oryx dammah), addax (Addax nasomaculatus), and dama gazelle (Gazella dama) provided:

(1) The purpose of such activity is associated with the management or transfer of live wildlife, including embryos and gametes, or sport hunting in a manner that contributes to increasing or sustaining captive numbers or to potential reintroduction to range countries;

(2) The specimen was captive-bred, in accordance with § 17.3, within the United States;

(3) All live specimens of that species held by the captive-breeding operation are managed in a manner that prevents hybridization of the species or subspecies.

(4) All live specimens of that species held by the captive-breeding operation are managed in a manner that maintains genetic diversity.

(5) Any export of or foreign commerce in a specimen meets the requirements of paragraph (g)(4) of this section, as well as parts 13, 14, and 23 of this chapter;

(6) Each specimen to be re-imported is uniquely identified by a tattoo or other means that is reported on the documentation required under paragraph (h)(5) of this section; and

(7) Each person claiming the benefit of the exception of this paragraph (h) must maintain accurate written records of activities, including births, deaths, and transfers of specimens, and make those records accessible to Service officials for inspection at reasonable hours set forth in §§ 13.46 and 13.47 of this chapter.

(8) The sport-hunted trophy consists of raw or tanned parts, such as bones, hair, head, hide, hooves, horns, meat, skull, rug, taxidermied head, shoulder, or full body mount, of a specimen that was taken by the hunter during a sport hunt for personal use. It does not include articles made from a trophy, such as worked, manufactured, or handicraft items for use as clothing, curios, ornamentation, jewelry, or other utilitarian items for commercial purposes. 

[40 FR 44415, Sept. 26, 1975, as amended at 40 FR 53400, Nov. 18, 1975; 41 FR 19226, May 11, 1976; 44 FR 31580, May 31, 1979; 44 FR 54007, Sept. 17, 1979; 58 FR 68325, Dec. 27, 1993; 63 FR 48640, Sept. 11, 1998; 68 FR 2919, Jan. 22, 2003; 68 FR 61136, Oct. 27, 2003; 70 FR 52318, Sept. 2, 2005]

SOURCE: 40 FR 44415, Sept. 26, 1975; 52 FR 29780, Aug. 11, 1987; 54 FR 5938, Feb. 7, 1989; 54 FR 38946, Sept. 21, 1989; 55 FR 39416, Sept. 27, 1990, unless otherwise noted.

AUTHORITY: 16 U.S.C. 1361-1407; 16 U.S.C. 1531-1544; 16 U.S.C. 4201-4245; Pub.L. 99-625, 100 Stat. 3500; unless otherwise noted.

§ 17.22 Permits for scientific purposes, enhancement of propagation or survival, or for incidental taking.

Upon receipt of a complete application, the Director may issue a permit authorizing any activity otherwise prohibited by § 17.21, in accordance with the issuance criteria of this section, for scientific purposes, for enhancing the propagation or survival, or for the incidental taking of endangered wildlife. Such permits may authorize a single transaction, a series of transactions, or a number of activities over a specific period of time. (See § 17.32 for permits for threatened species.) The Director shall publish notice in the Federal Register of each application for a permit that is made under this section. Each notice shall invite the submission from interested parties, within 30 days after the date of the notice, of written data, views, or arguments with respect to the application. The 30-day period may be waived by the Director in an emergency situation where the life or health of an endangered animal is threatened and no reasonable alternative is available to the applicant. Notice of any such waiver shall be published in the Federal Register within 10 days following issuance of the permit.

(a)(1) Application requirements for permits for scientific purposes or for the enhancement of propagation or survival. A person wishing to get a permit for an activity prohibited by § 17.21 submits an application for activities under this paragraph. The Service provides Form 3-200 for the application to which all of the following must be attained:

(i) The common and scientific names of the species sought to the covered by the permit, as well as the number, age, and sex of such species, and the activity sought to be authorized (such as taking, exporting, selling in interstate commerce);

(ii) A statement as to whether, at the time of application, the wildlife sought to be covered by the permit (A) is still in the wild, (B) has already been removed from the wild, or (C) was born in captivity;

(iii) A resume of the applicant's attempts to obtain the wildlife sought to be covered by the permit in a manner which would not cause the death or removal from the wild of such wildlife;

(iv) If the wildlife sought to be covered by the permit has already been removed from the wild, the country and place where such removal occurred; if the wildlife sought to be covered by the permit was born in captivity, the country and place where such wildlife was born;

(v) A complete description and address of the institution or other facility where the wildlife sought to be covered by the permit will be used, displayed, or maintained;

(vi) If the applicant seeks to have live wildlife covered by the permit, a complete description, including photographs or diagrams, of the facilities to house and/or care for the wildlife and a resume of the experience of those person who will be caring for the wildlife;

(vii) A full statement of the reasons why the applicant is justified in obtaining a permit including the details of the activities sought to be authorized by the permit;

(viii) If the application is for the purpose of enhancement of propagation, a statement of the applicant's willingness to participate in a cooperative breeding program and to maintain or contribute data to a studbook;

(2) Issuance criteria. Upon receiving an application completed in accordance with paragraph (a)(1) of this section, the Director will decide whether or not a permit should be issued. In making this decision, the Director shall consider, in addition to the general criteria in § 13.21(b) of this subchapter, the following factors:

(i) Whether the purpose for which the permit is required is adequate to justify removing from the wild or otherwise changing the status of the wildlife sought to be covered by the permit;

(ii) The probable direct and indirect effect which issuing the permit would have on the wild populations of the wildlife sought to be covered by the permit;

(iii) Whether the permit, if issued, would in any way, directly or indirectly, conflict with any known program intended to enhance the survival probabilities of the population from which the wildlife sought to be covered by the permit was or would be removed;

(iv) Whether the purpose for which the permit is required would be likely to reduce the threat of extinction facing the species of wildlife sought to be covered by the permit;

(v) The opinions or views of scientists or other persons or organizations having expertise concerning the wildlife or other matters germane to the application; and

(vi) Whether the expertise, facilities, or other resources available to the applicant appear adequate to successfully accomplish the objectives stated in the application.

(3) Permit conditions. In addition to the general conditions set forth in Part 13 of this subchapter, every permit issued under this paragraph shall be subject to the special condition that the escape of living wildlife covered by the permit shall be immediately reported to the Service office designated in the permit.

(4) Duration of permits. The duration of permits issued under this paragraph shall be designated on the face of the permit.

(b)(1) Application requirements for permits for incidental taking. A person wishing to get a permit for an activity prohibited by § 17.21(c) submits an application for activities under this paragraph. The Service provides Form 3- 200 for the application to which all of the following must be attached:

(i) A complete description of the activity sought to be authorized;

(ii) The common and scientific names of the species sought to be covered by the permit, as well as the number, age, and sex of such species, if known;

(iii) A conservation plan that specifies:

(A) The impact that will likely result from such taking;

(B) What steps the applicant will take to monitor, minimize, and mitigate such impacts, the funding that will be available to implement such steps, and the procedures to be used to deal with unforeseen circumstances;

(C) What alternative actions to such taking the applicant considered and the reasons why such alternatives are not proposed to be utilized; and

(D) Such other measures that the Director may require as being necessary or appropriate for purposes of the plan;

(2) Issuance criteria.

(i) Upon receiving an application completed in accordance with paragraph (b)(1) of this section, the Director will decide whether or not a permit should be issued. The Director shall consider the general issuance criteria in § 13.21(b) of this subchapter, except for § 13.21(b)(4), and shall issue the permit if he or she finds that:

(A) The taking will be incidental;

(B) The applicant will, to the maximum extent practicable, minimize and mitigate the impacts of such takings;

(C) The applicant will ensure that adequate funding for the conservation plan and procedures to deal with unforeseen circumstances will be provided;

(D) The taking will not appreciably reduce the likelihood of the survival and recovery of the species in the wild;

(E) The measures, if any, required under paragraph (b)(1)(iii)(D) of this section will be met; and

(F) He or she has received such other assurances as he or she may require that the plan will be implemented.

(ii) In making his or her decision, the Director shall also consider the anticipated duration and geographic scope of the applicant's planned activities, including the amount of listed species habitat that is involved and the degree to which listed species and their habitats are affected.

(3) Permit conditions. In addition to the general conditions set forth in Part 13 of this subchapter, every permit issued under this paragraph shall contain such terms and conditions as the Director deems necessary or appropriate to carry out the purposes of the permit and the conservation plan including, but not limited to, monitoring and reporting requirements deemed necessary for determining whether such terms and conditions are being complied with. The Director shall rely upon existing reporting requirements to the maximum extent practicable.

(4) Duration of permits. The duration of permits issued under this paragraph shall be sufficient to provide adequate assurances to the permittee to commit funding necessary for the activities authorized by the permit, including conservation activities and land use restrictions. In determining the duration of a permit, the Director shall consider the duration of the planned activities, as well as the possible positive and negative effects associated with permits of the proposed duration on listed species, including the extent to which the conservation plan will enhance the habitat of listed species and increase the long-term survivability of such species.

(5) Assurances provided to permittee in case of changed or unforeseen circumstances. The assurances in this paragraph (b)(5) apply only to incidental take permits issued in accordance with paragraph (b)(2) of this section where the conservation plan is being properly implemented, and apply only with respect to species adequately covered by the conservation plan. These assurances cannot be provided to Federal agencies. This rule does not apply to incidental take permits issued prior to March 25, 1998. The assurances provided in incidental take permits issued prior to March 25, 1998 remain in effect, and those permits will not be revised as a result of this rulemaking.

(i) Changed circumstances provided for in the plan. If additional conservation and mitigation measures are deemed necessary to respond to changed circumstances and were provided for in the plan's operating conservation program, the permittee will implement the measures specified in the plan.

(ii) Changed circumstances not provided for in the plan. If additional conservation and mitigation measures are deemed necessary to respond to changed circumstances and such measures were not provided for in the plan's operating conservation program, the Director will not require any conservation and mitigation measures in addition to those provided for in the plan without the consent of the permittee, provided the plan is being properly implemented.

(iii) Unforeseen circumstances.

(A) In negotiating unforeseen circumstances, the Director will not require the commitment of additional land, water, or financial compensation or additional restrictions on the use of land, water, or other natural resources beyond the level otherwise agreed upon for the species covered by the conservation plan without the consent of the permittee.

(B) If additional conservation and mitigation measures are deemed necessary to respond to unforeseen circumstances, the Director may require additional measures of the permittee where the conservation plan is being properly implemented, but only if such measures are limited to modifications within conserved habitat areas, if any, or to the conservation plan's operating conservation program for the affected species, and maintain the original terms of the conservation plan to the maximum extent possible. Additional conservation and mitigation measures will not involve the commitment of additional land, water or financial compensation or additional restrictions on the use of land, water, or other natural resources otherwise available for development or use under the original terms of the conservation plan without the consent of the permittee.

(C) The Director will have the burden of demonstrating that unforeseen circumstances exist, using the best scientific and commercial data available. These findings must be clearly documented and based upon reliable technical information regarding the status and habitat requirements of the affected species. The Director will consider, but not be limited to, the following factors:

(1) Size of the current range of the affected species;

(2) Percentage of range adversely affected by the conservation plan;

(3) Percentage of range conserved by the conservation plan;

(4) Ecological significance of that portion of the range affected by the conservation plan;

(5) Level of knowledge about the affected species and the degree of specificity of the species' conservation program under the conservation plan; and

(6) Whether failure to adopt additional conservation measures would appreciably reduce the likelihood of survival and recovery of the affected species in the wild.

(6) Nothing in this rule will be construed to limit or constrain the Director, any Federal, State, local, or Tribal government agency, or a private entity, from taking additional actions at its own expense to protect or conserve a species included in a conservation plan.

(7) Discontinuance of permit activity. Notwithstanding the provisions of § 13.26 of this subchapter, a permittee under this paragraph (b) remains responsible for any outstanding minimization and mitigation measures required under the terms of the permit for take that occurs prior to surrender of the permit and such minimization and mitigation measures as may be required pursuant to the termination provisions of an implementing agreement, habitat conservation plan, or permit even after surrendering the permit to the Service pursuant to § 13.26 of this subchapter. The permit shall be deemed canceled only upon a determination by the Service that such minimization and mitigation measures have been implemented. Upon surrender of the permit, no further take shall be authorized under the terms of the surrendered permit.

(8) Criteria for revocation. A permit issued under paragraph (b) of this section may not be revoked for any reason except those set forth in § 13.28(a)(1) through (4) of this subchapter or unless continuation of the permitted activity would be inconsistent with the criterion set forth in 16 U.S.C. 1539(a)(2)(B)(iv) and the inconsistency has not been remedied.

(c)(1) Application requirements for permits for the enhancement of survival through Safe Harbor Agreements. The applicant must submit an application for a permit under this paragraph (c) to the appropriate Regional Director, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, for the Region where the applicant resides or where the proposed activity is to occur (for appropriate addresses, see 50 CFR 10.22), if the applicant wishes to engage in any activity prohibited by § 17.21. The applicant must submit an official Service application form (3-200.54) that includes the following information:

(i) The common and scientific names of the listed species for which the applicant requests incidental take authorization;

(ii) A description of how incidental take of the listed species pursuant to the Safe Harbor Agreement is likely to occur, both as a result of management activities and as a result of the return to baseline; and

(iii) A Safe Harbor Agreement that complies with the requirements of the Safe Harbor policy available from the Service.

(2) Issuance criteria. Upon receiving an application completed in accordance with paragraph (c)(1) of this section, the Director will decide whether or not to issue a permit. The Director shall consider the general issuance criteria in § 13.21(b) of this subchapter, except for § 13.21(b)(4), and may issue the permit if he or she finds:

(i) The take will be incidental to an otherwise lawful activity and will be in accordance with the terms of the Safe Harbor Agreement;

(ii) The implementation of the terms of the Safe Harbor Agreement is reasonably expected to provide a net conservation benefit to the affected listed species by contributing to the recovery of listed species included in the permit, and the Safe Harbor Agreement otherwise complies with the Safe Harbor policy available from the Service;

(iii) The probable direct and indirect effects of any authorized take will not appreciably reduce the likelihood of survival and recovery in the wild of any listed species;

(iv) Implementation of the terms of the Safe Harbor Agreement is consistent with applicable Federal, State, and Tribal laws and regulations;

(v) Implementation of the terms of the Safe Harbor Agreement will not be in conflict with any ongoing conservation or recovery programs for listed species covered by the permit; and

(vi) The applicant has shown capability for and commitment to implementing all of the terms of the Safe Harbor Agreement.

(3) Permit conditions. In addition to any applicable general permit conditions set forth in part 13 of this subchapter, every permit issued under this paragraph (c) is subject to the following special conditions:

(i) A requirement for the participating property owner to notify the Service of any transfer of lands subject to a Safe Harbor Agreement;

(ii) When appropriate, a requirement for the permittee to give the Service reasonable advance notice (generally at least 30 days) of when he or she expects to incidentally take any listed species covered under the permit. Such notification will provide the Service with an opportunity to relocate affected individuals of the species, if possible and appropriate; and

(iii) Any additional requirements or conditions the Director deems necessary or appropriate to carry out the purposes of the permit and the Safe Harbor Agreement.

(4) Permit effective date. Permits issued under this paragraph (c) become effective the day of issuance for species covered by the Safe Harbor Agreement.

(5) Assurances provided to permittee.

(i) The assurances in paragraph (c)(5)(ii) of this section (c)(5) apply only to Safe Harbor permits issued in accordance with paragraph (c)(2) of this section where the Safe Harbor Agreement is being properly implemented, and apply only with respect to species covered by the Agreement and permit. These assurances cannot be provided to Federal agencies. The assurances provided in this section apply only to Safe Harbor permits issued after July 19, 1999.

(ii) The Director and the permittee may agree to revise or modify the management measures set forth in a Safe Harbor Agreement if the Director determines that such revisions or modifications do not change the Director's prior determination that the Safe Harbor Agreement is reasonably expected to provide a net conservation benefit to the listed species. However, the Director may not require additional or different management activities to be undertaken by a permittee without the consent of the permittee.

(6) Additional actions. Nothing in this rule will be construed to limit or constrain the Director, any Federal, State, local or Tribal government agency, or a private entity, from taking additional actions at its own expense to protect or conserve a species included in a Safe Harbor Agreement.

(7) Criteria for revocation. The Director may not revoke a permit issued under paragraph (c) of this section except as provided in this paragraph. The Director may revoke a permit for any reason set forth in § 13.28(a)(1) through (4) of this subchapter. The Director may revoke a permit if continuation of the permitted activity would either appreciably reduce the likelihood of survival and recovery in the wild of any listed species or directly or indirectly alter designated critical habitat such that it appreciably diminishes the value of that critical habitat for both the survival and recovery of a listed species. Before revoking a permit for either of the latter two reasons, the Director, with the consent of the permittee, will pursue all appropriate options to avoid permit revocation. These options may include, but are not limited to: extending or modifying the existing permit, capturing and relocating the species, compensating the landowner to forgo the activity, purchasing an easement or fee simple interest in the property, or arranging for a third-party acquisition of an interest in the property.

(8) Duration of permits. The duration of permits issued under this paragraph (c) must be sufficient to provide a net conservation benefit to species covered in the enhancement of survival permit. In determining the duration of a permit, the Director will consider the duration of the planned activities, as well as the positive and negative effects associated with permits of the proposed duration on covered species, including the extent to which the conservation activities included in the Safe Harbor Agreement will enhance the survival and contribute to the recovery of listed species included in the permit.

(d)(1) Application requirements for permits for the enhancement of survival through Candidate Conservation Agreements with Assurances. The applicant must submit an application for a permit under this paragraph (d) to the appropriate Regional Director, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, for the Region where the applicant resides or where the proposed activity is to occur (for appropriate addresses, see 50 CFR 10.22). When a species covered by a Candidate Conservation Agreement with Assurances is listed as endangered and the applicant wishes to engage in activities identified in the Agreement and otherwise prohibited by § 17.31, the applicant must apply for an enhancement of survival permit for species covered by the Agreement. The permit will become valid if and when covered proposed, candidate or other unlisted species is listed as an endangered species. The applicant must submit an official Service application form (3-200.54) that includes the following information:

(i) The common and scientific names of the species for which the applicant requests incidental take authorization;

(ii) A description of the land use or water management activity for which the applicant requests incidental take authorization; and

(iii) A Candidate Conservation Agreement that complies with the requirements of the Candidate Conservation Agreement with Assurances policy available from the Service.

(2) Issuance criteria. Upon receiving an application completed in accordance with paragraph (d)(1) of this section, the Director will decide whether or not to issue a permit. The Director shall consider the general issuance criteria in § 13.21(b) of this subchapter, except for § 13.21(b)(4), and may issue the permit if he or she finds:

(i) The take will be incidental to an otherwise lawful activity and will be in accordance with the terms of the Candidate Conservation Agreement;

(ii) The Candidate Conservation Agreement complies with the requirements of the Candidate Conservation Agreement with Assurances policy available from the Service;

(iii) The probable direct and indirect effects of any authorized take will not appreciably reduce the likelihood of survival and recovery in the wild of any species;

(iv) Implementation of the terms of the Candidate Conservation Agreement is consistent with applicable Federal, State, and Tribal laws and regulations;

(v) Implementation of the terms of the Candidate Conservation Agreement will not be in conflict with any ongoing conservation programs for species covered by the permit; and

(vi) The applicant has shown capability for and commitment to implementing all of the terms of the Candidate Conservation Agreement.

(3) Permit conditions. In addition to any applicable general permit conditions set forth in part 13 of this subchapter, every permit issued under this paragraph (d) is subject to the following special conditions:

(i) A requirement for the property owner to notify the Service of any transfer of lands subject to a Candidate Conservation Agreement;

(ii) When appropriate, a requirement for the permittee to give the Service reasonable advance notice (generally at least 30 days) of when he or she expects to incidentally take any listed species covered under the permit. Such notification will provide the Service with an opportunity to relocate affected individuals of the species, if possible and appropriate; and

(iii) Any additional requirements or conditions the Director deems necessary or appropriate to carry out the purposes of the permit and the Candidate Conservation Agreement.

(4) Permit effective date. Permits issued under this paragraph (d) become effective for a species covered by a Candidate Conservation Agreement on the effective date of a final rule that lists a covered species as endangered.

(5) Assurances provided to permittee in case of changed or unforeseen circumstances. The assurances in this paragraph (d)(5) apply only to permits issued in accordance with paragraph (d)(2) where the Candidate Conservation with Assurances Agreement is being properly implemented, and apply only with respect to species adequately covered by the Candidate Conservation with Assurances Agreement. These assurances cannot be provided to Federal agencies.

(i) Changed circumstances provided for in the Agreement. If the Director determines that additional conservation measures are necessary to respond to changed circumstances and these measures were set forth in the Agreement, the permittee will implement the measures specified in the Agreement.

(ii) Changed circumstances not provided for in the Agreement. If the Director determines that additional conservation measures not provided for in the Agreement are necessary to respond to changed circumstances, the Director will not require any conservation measures in addition to those provided for in the Agreement without the consent of the permittee, provided the Agreement is being properly implemented.

(iii) Unforeseen circumstances.

(A) In negotiating unforeseen circumstances, the Director will not require the commitment of additional land, water, or financial compensation or additional restrictions on the use of land, water, or other natural resources beyond the level otherwise agreed upon for the species covered by the Agreement without the consent of the permittee.

(B) If the Director determines additional conservation measures are necessary to respond to unforeseen circumstances, the Director may require additional measures of the permittee where the Agreement is being properly implemented, but only if such measures maintain the original terms of the Agreement to the maximum extent possible. Additional conservation measures will not involve the commitment of additional land, water, or financial compensation or additional restrictions on the use of land, water, or other natural resources otherwise available for development or use under the original terms of the Agreement without the consent of the permittee.

(C) The Director will have the burden of demonstrating that unforeseen circumstances exist, using the best scientific and commercial data available. These findings must be clearly documented and based upon reliable technical information regarding the status and habitat requirements of the affected species. The Director will consider, but not be limited to, the following factors:

(1) Size of the current range of the affected species;

(2) Percentage of range adversely affected by the Agreement;

(3) Percentage of range conserved by the Agreement;

(4) Ecological significance of that portion of the range affected by the Agreement;

(5) Level of knowledge about the affected species and the degree of specificity of the species' conservation program under the Agreement; and

(6) Whether failure to adopt additional conservation measures would appreciably reduce the likelihood of survival and recovery of the affected species in the wild.

(6) Additional actions. Nothing in this rule will be construed to limit or constrain the Director, any Federal, State, local or Tribal government agency, or a private entity, from taking additional actions at its own expense to protect or conserve a species included in a Candidate Conservation with Assurances Agreement.

(7) Criteria for revocation. The Director may not revoke a permit issued under paragraph (d) of this section except as provided in this paragraph. The Director may revoke a permit for any reason set forth in § 13.28(a)(1) through (4) of this subchapter. The Director may revoke a permit if continuation of the permitted activity would either appreciably reduce the likelihood of survival and recovery in the wild of any listed species or directly or indirectly alter designated critical habitat such that it appreciably diminishes the value of that critical habitat for both the survival and recovery of a listed species. Before revoking a permit for either of the latter two reasons, the Director, with the consent of the permittee, will pursue all appropriate options to avoid permit revocation. These options may include, but are not limited to: extending or modifying the existing permit, capturing and relocating the species, compensating the landowner to forgo the activity, purchasing an easement or fee simple interest in the property, or arranging for a third-party acquisition of an interest in the property.

(8) Duration of the Candidate Conservation Agreement. The duration of a Candidate Conservation Agreement covered by a permit issued under this paragraph (d) must be sufficient to enable the Director to determine that the benefits of the conservation measures in the Agreement, when combined with those benefits that would be achieved if it is assumed that the conservation measures would also be implemented on other necessary properties, would preclude or remove any need to list the species covered by the Agreement.

(e) Objection to permit issuance.

(1) In regard to any notice of a permit application published in the Federal Register, any interested party that objects to the issuance of a permit, in whole or in part, may, during the comment period specified in the notice, request notification of the final action to be taken on the application. A separate written request shall be made for each permit application. Such a request shall specify the Service's permit application number and state the reasons why that party believes the applicant does not meet the issuance criteria contained in §§ 13.21 and 17.22 of this subchapter or other reasons why the permit should not be issued.

(2) If the Service decides to issue a permit contrary to objections received pursuant to paragraph (c)(1) of this section, then the Service shall, at least ten days prior to issuance of the permit, make reasonable efforts to contact by telephone or other expedient means, any party who has made a request pursuant to paragraph (c)(1) of this section and inform that party of the issuance of the permit. However, the Service may reduce the time period or dispense with such notice if it determines that time is of the essence and that delay in issuance of the permit would: (i) Harm the specimen or population involved; or (ii) unduly hinder the actions authorized under the permit.

(3) The Service will notify any party filing an objection and request for notice under paragraph (c)(1) of this section of the final action taken on the application, in writing. If the Service has reduced or dispensed with the notice period referred to in paragraph (c)(2) of this section, it will include its reasons therefore in such written notice. 

[40 FR 44415, Sept. 26, 1975, as amended at 40 FR 53400, Nov. 18, 1975; 41 FR 19926, May 11, 1976; 47 FR 30786, July 15, 1982; 50 FR 39687, Sept. 30, 1985; 63 FR 8871, Feb. 23, 1998; 63 FR 52635, Oct. 1, 1998; 64 FR 32711, June 17, 1999; 64 FR 52676, Sept. 30, 1999; 69 FR 24092, May 3, 2004; 69 FR 29670, May 25, 2004; 69 FR 71731, Dec. 10, 2004]

50 C. F. R. § 17.22, 50 CFR § 17.22
SOURCE: 40 FR 44415, Sept. 26, 1975; 52 FR 29780, Aug. 11, 1987; 54 FR 5938, Feb. 7, 1989; 54 FR 38946, Sept. 21, 1989; 55 FR 39416, Sept. 27, 1990, unless otherwise noted.

AUTHORITY: 16 U.S.C. 13611407; 16 U.S.C. 15311544; 16 U.S.C. 42014245; Pub.L. 99625, 100 Stat. 3500; unless otherwise noted.

§ 17.23 Economic hardship permits.

Upon receipt of a complete application, the Director may issue a permit authorizing any activity otherwise prohibited by § 17.21, in accordance with the issuance criteria of this section in order to prevent undue economic hardship. The Director shall publish notice in the Federal Register of each application for a permit that is made under this section. Each notice shall invite the submission from interested parties, within 30 days after the date of the notice, of written data, views, or arguments with respect to the application. The 30-day period may be waived by the Director in an emergency situation where the life or health of an endangered animal is threatened and no reasonable alternative is available to the applicant. Notice of any such waiver shall be published in the Federal Register within 10 days following issuance of the permit.

(a) Application requirements. Applications for permits under this section must be submitted to the Director by the person allegedly suffering undue economic hardship because his desired activity is prohibited by § 17.21. Each application must be submitted on an official application form (Form 3-200) provided by the Service, and must include, as an attachment, all of the information required in § 17.22 plus the following additional information:

(1) The possible legal, economic or subsistence alternatives to the activity sought to be authorized by the permit;

(2) A full statement, accompanied by copies of all relevant contracts and correspondence, showing the applicant's involvement with the wildlife sought to be covered by the permit (as well as his involvement with similar wildlife), including, where applicable, that portion of applicant's income derived from the taking of such wildlife, or the subsistence use of such wildlife, during the calendar year immediately preceding either the notice in the Federal Register of review of the status of the species or of the proposal to list such wildlife as endangered, whichever is earliest;

(3) Where applicable, proof of a contract or other binding legal obligation which:

(i) Deals specifically with the wildlife sought to be covered by the permit;

(ii) Became binding prior to the date when the notice of a review of the status of the species or the notice of proposed rulemaking proposing to list such wildlife as endangered was published in the Federal Register, whichever is earlier; and

(iii) Will cause monetary loss of a given dollar amount if the permit sought under this section is not granted.

(b) Issuance criteria. Upon receiving an application completed in accordance with paragraph (a) of this section, the Director will decide whether or not a permit should be issued under any of the three categories of economic hardship, as defined in section 10(b)(2) of the Act. In making his decisions, the Director shall consider, in addition to the general criteria in § 13.21(b) of this subchapter, the following factors:

(1) Whether the purpose for which the permit is being requested is adequate to justify removing from the wild or otherwise changing the status of the wildlife sought to be covered by the permit;

(2) The probable direct and indirect effect which issuing the permit would have on the wild populations of the wildlife sought to be covered by the permit;

(3) The economic, legal, subsistence, or other alternatives or relief available to the applicant;

(4) The amount of evidence that the applicant was in fact party to a contract or other binding legal obligation which;

(i) Deals specifically with the wildlife sought to be covered by the permit; and

(ii) Became binding prior to the date when the notice of a review of the status of the species or the notice of proposed rulemaking proposing to list such wildlife as endangered was published in the Federal Register, whichever is earlier.

(5) The severity of economic hardship which the contract or other binding legal obligation referred to in paragraph (b)(4) of this section would cause if the permit were denied;

(6) Where applicable, the portion of the applicant's income which would be lost if the permit were denied, and the relationship of that portion to the balance of his income;

(7) Where applicable, the nature and extent of subsistence taking generally by the applicant; and

(8) The likelihood that applicant can reasonably carry out his desired activity within one year from the date a notice is published in the Federal Register to review status of such wildlife, or to list such wildlife as endangered, whichever is earlier.

(c) Permit conditions. In addition to the general conditions set forth in Part 13 of this subchapter, every permit issued under this section shall be subject to the following special conditions:

(1) In addition to any reporting requirements contained in the permit itself, the permittee shall also submit to the Director a written report of his activities pursuant to the permit. Such report must be postmarked or actually delivered no later than 10 days after completion of the activity.

(2) The death or escape of all living wildlife covered by the permit shall be immediately reported to the Service's office designated in the permit.

(d) Duration of permits issued under this section shall be designated on the face of the permit. No permit issued under this section, however, shall be valid for more than one year from the date a notice is published in the Federal Register to review status of such wildlife, or to list such wildlife as endangered, whichever is earlier.

[40 FR 44415, Sept. 26, 1975, as amended at 40 FR 53400, Nov. 18, 1975; 40 FR 58307, Dec. 16, 1975; 50 FR 39688, Sept. 30, 1985]

SOURCE: 40 FR 44415, Sept. 26, 1975; 52 FR 29780, Aug. 11, 1987; 54 FR 5938, Feb. 7, 1989; 54 FR 38946, Sept. 21, 1989; 55 FR 39416, Sept. 27, 1990, unless otherwise noted.

AUTHORITY: 16 U.S.C. 1361-1407; 16 U.S.C. 1531-1544; 16 U.S.C. 4201-4245; Pub.L. 99-625, 100 Stat. 3500; unless otherwise noted.

 



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